CUMBERCAT

Benedict Cumberbatch.
You really don't need much more.

(Source: runawaytowherever)

larygo:

from The Blind Banker

larygo:

from The Blind Banker

"…don’t let them in, don’t let them see!" Poor Mikey! :D

(Source: gatissed, via benaddictmindpalace)

matthewtennant-snogged-johnlock asked: Once I was looking for some nail polish in my moms draw and I found lube, K&Y, and a sex dice... I fucking died and have never gone near that drawer again.

jamesmoriartay:

A SEX DICE???

dex5m:

Don’t worry, Mary. I have been tutoring him.

dex5m:

Don’t worry, Mary. I have been tutoring him.

(via bbcjohn)

nothingsweeterthanben:

www.sky.com/tv/show/playhouse-presents

youcanmakethedifference:

Benedict’s face says it all! [X]

(via tinkertailorsoldierspy1976)

kingmycroftholmes:

TRY HARDER.

Q: What, to you, is the essence of Sherlock Holmes that makes him that character, instead of a great detective you could just invent from scratch?

MOFFAT: I think he is absolutely distinct, but I think you can’t take him in isolation. If you take him in isolation, he’s kind of ‘Mr. Spock, Baker Street’ or something. You have to actually take him as what he really is: a jewel.

It’s a partnership. These two characters, Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson, are not only of equal stature in the original [book] series; Watson is arguably the main character. He’s the one who’s telling the story. It’s all happening to him.

It is that friendship: you take this cold, remarkable, difficult, dangerous, borderline psychopath man, and you wonder what might have happened to him had he not met his best friend—a friend that no one would have put him with… this solid, dependable, brave, big-hearted war hero.

I think people fall in love—not with Sherlock Holmes or Dr. Watson, but with their friendship. I think it is the most famous friendship in fiction, without a doubt. It is a moving and affecting one, and best of all, it’s a great portrait as in the original stories of a male friendship, by which I mean it is never discussed at all. They never mention it. They never have one moment of articulated affection. Neither have we [Moffat and Gatiss]. Why would we? We don’t do it. We’re men. We have no emotions. [Moffat laughs.]

So the story of Sherlock Holmes, on the surface, is about detection, but in reality, it’s about the best of two men who save each other: a lost, washed-up war hero and a man who could end up committing murders instead of solving them. They come together. They become this perfect unit. They become the best friendship ever, and they become heroes.

That’s what we fall in love with, not Sherlock on his own. No one can love that man on his own, but Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson – the best friends ever.

GATISS: We found as well—we join the story at just the right point, when Watson joins [Holmes].

Without him, Holmes is a rather unbearable man. He’s going out there, as well. He’s getting further and further away, like a distant star. And this man arrives, who essentially makes him more human, and together they make a perfect unit.”

—   

Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss

(Assignment X interview, November 2010 [x])

(Source: skulls-and-tea)

(Source: cumberdaily, via cumberbsctch)

“‘It only remains for us to find out what this secret was which the sailor Hudson seems to have held over the heads of these two wealthy and respected men.’
‘Alas, Holmes, I fear that it is one of sin and shame!’ cried my friend. ‘But from you I shall have no secrets.’”

—   

Victor Trevor to Sherlock Holmes

(Arthur Conan Doyle, The adventure of the ”Gloria Scott”)

(Source: thenorwoodbuilder, via masteringsherlockination)

moriartysskull:

I remember the time when he did it with both hands, the whole length of his inner thighs…. I moaned out loudly in a public place scrolling my dashboard….

This one?

(Source: runawaytowherever, via esrasherlocked)